Oriental wind keto cake

Oriental Wind Keto cake is turbo inspired, aromatic and quite intensive in taste. If you are a lover of oriental desserts, then you know what it means! Take Baklava, Basbousa/Ravani or Halva for example… All these oriental treats, in their original forms, scream one thing – the villain called sugar! We’ve learned we can live perfectly without sugar, but this doesn’t mean we can’t ketonise oriental treats! I think the best example of the East and West collision in a form of Ketonised and sugar-free dessert is our Keto Mandolato!

Keto Nougat

Mandolato became known due to Emperor Justinianus. He simply adored it! There’s a legend about his secret encounters with the future Empress Theodora. The legend says that he would always bring Mandolato to Theodora as an aphrodisiac.
The authentic recipe has been obtained sometimes in the 18th century and its flavour has been the same until present times. The best Mandolato comes from the Ionian islands where it is offered in abundance. The islands of Corfu and Zakynthos take pride in this delicacy. However, if you want to stay in ketosis, don’t even have a bite of the original version. It’s overloaded with sugar!

Well, yes, we admit, oriental treats are too sweet 🙁 and you really have to be careful 😮 with the dosing! Even the Keto versions, if you really want them to resemble the original traditional things, have to lean a bit more on the sweeter side. But, this doesn’t mean you’ll eat twenty pieces at once. 😉 Also, you will not be making them every day – The universe forbid! 🙂

Go easy on sweetener…

We already wrote an article on sweeteners, yet we continue using them. We are totally aware of the danger and that many Ketonians tend to overuse sweetener on Keto. However, this particular cake can be prepared once per year when you really want to celebrate something. In general, the whole cake contains 8 tbsp of stevia or monk fruit blend sweetener. When you divide this into 25 slices, you’ll end up with 0,32 tablespoon of sweetener per piece. That’s like a 1/3 of a tablespoon per slice – not too much!

If you have that special occasion or you just want to impress your family members with a true masterpiece from keto kitchen, then this cake is for you.

Where the east and west collide

Both of us (Apollonas and Roberta) grew up in the countries where eastern and western worlds, civilisations and cultures collide. Greece, from ancient times, was impressed with the cultures coming from the East. The best proof of that impression is Alexander the Great! He decided to go East, not West for his conquering campaigns.  On the other side, I grew up in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country where even now you can experience 3 different cultures in architecture, culture and culinary tradition. In fact, this particular Oriental Wind Keto cake was born in such an environment.

My friend the wind will come from the east…

The wind can come from the East, but there’s always some Wester finishing touch to it! This is how this cake was born! Now, you might say, on Greek Goes Keto all the recipes are loaded with nuts. Not always, but if we are giving you an Eastern exposure, you know that you can’t go without nuts and syrup. Before we move to the recipe, please see our video tutorial. I believe everything is shown, so there can’t be any mistakes. Everyone can succeed and have the most impressive Keto cake on their festive table. The cake is children friendly and even Non-Ketonians will adore it!

Oriental Wind Keto Cake

Oriental Wind Keto Cake

Course Keto Dessert
Cuisine Keto Mediterranean, Keto Oriental
Keyword Oriental Keto Cake
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
assembling 10 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 25
Author Roberta Kapsalis

Ingredients

Cake base

  • 8 medium eggs free-range
  • 1-2 tbsp lemon zest
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp citric acid Alternatively, use 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 4 tbsp stevia-blend Monk fruit blend would be even better
  • 250 g (1 cup) butter grass-fed, melted
  • 1-2 pinch nutmeg ground (if it's freshly ground, just a small pinch)
  • 1 tbsp psyllium powder
  • 12 tbsp roasted almonds and walnuts mixture finely ground
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract alternatively use 1 tsp ground vanilla bean
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 50 ml (1/4 cup) sparkling mineral water

Syrup

  • 200 ml (1 cup) fresh water
  • 4 slices lemon Use the one you previously grated the zest off
  • 2 sticks cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp stevia-blend Monk fruit blend would be even better
  • 1 tbsp dark rum extract
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract

Icing - white

  • 500 g (2 cups) mascarpone additives-free
  • 5 heaped tbsp sour cream organic, more than 25% fat
  • 12 tbsp of previously prepared syrup
  • 2 tbsp stevia-blend This is completely optional

Icing - dark

  • 1 half of the white icing earlier prepared
  • 4 tbsp flaxseed meal organic
  • 2 tbsp cacao powder organic
  • 1,5 tbsp stevia blend Monk fruit blend would be even better
  • 2 tsp dark rum extract

Instructions

  1. Roast 150g of walnuts and 80g of almonds in a dry pan over medium temperature. let them cool down totally and then, finely grind them. 

  2. Beat the eggs with sea salt, citric acid and sweetener. Add melted (but cooled) butter and beat for at least 5 minutes at high speed.

  3. Add nutmeg, vanilla extract and psyllium. Beat for a minute. Add 4 tbsp of nuts and beat for another minute. Repeat adding 4 tablespoons of nuts and beating  2 more times until you use 12 tbsp of roasted nuts mixture. 

  4. Now sprinkle baking soda and mix. In the end, add sparkling mineral water while beating at a lower speed.

  5. Line an 11-inch cake mould with parchment paper and grease the sides with some coconut oil or butter. Pour in the cake batter and bake for 35 minutes at 150ºC (350ºF) When it's baked, remove it from the mould and let it cool down totally!

Syrup

  1. Place all the ingredients in a deep saucepan and bring them to a boil. Let the syrup simmer for 3-4 minutes and set aside to cool down.

Icing

  1. beat Mascarpone, sour cream, stevia, and 12 tbsp of syrup for at least 5 minutes at a high speed. The icing will get thicker and fluffier if you use the highest speed your mixer can achieve. 

  2. Divide this icing into 2 equal parts. Add flaxseed meal, cacao powder, rum extract and some extra stevia (optional). beat for 3 minutes.

Assembling the cake

  1. When the cake base is totally cool sprinkle it with some syrup and let it "drink the syrup". Now place the dark icing on top and spread it.  

  2. Add the white icing on top. Using a fork make some nice waves that resemble the desert dunes. 

  3. Decorate with some walnuts, lemon and cinnamon stick from the syrup, and a few cloves!  

Recipe Notes

In some countries, Mascarpone and sour cream are not very thick like the one we use. (See the video) in that case, don't use the syrup in the icing, just add some more Ceylon cinnamon. 

This cake base can easily be cut in half and then you can assemble it as a layered cake. Make sure you pour some syrup on both cake layers before assembling.

The cake is very aromatic and provides great satiety. Make sure you don't cut big pieces, a very thin one is perfect after a good Keto meal. 

 

Oriental wind keto cake